Spanish Company Iberdrola Launches a New 1,200 MW Offshore Wind Energy Plan in the USA.

“Iberdrola, through Vineyard Wind, aspires to the development of a new marine wind power project in United States waters, this time in the State of Connecticut, for the development of up to 1,200 megawatts (MW).

Vineyard Wind, a 50% owned company by Avangrid – the US subsidiary of the Spanish group – and the Danish fund Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP), presented the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) its wind power project ‘Park City Wind ‘, which includes proposals for the development of 408 MW wind farm and options for 800 MW, 1,000 MW and 1,200 MW, which would be built in one of the two lease areas assigned to the company.

These lease areas are located south of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, in one of the areas with the strongest winds on the east coast of the country, and are not visible from any part of the Connecticut waterfront. “

Read all article and extract the benefits of this proposal to Connecticut and other coastal states in the USA.

Source: https://www.evwind.es/2019/10/01/iberdrola-launches-a-new-1200-mw-us-offshore-wind-energy-plan/71126

Offshore Wind Farms in the US and Wind Energy in Spain / #SDG7

Wind turbines in La Palma, Canary Islands. Photo by @DrLepervanche. With 23,484 MW of accumulated capacity, wind energy has been the second source of electrical generation in Spain in 2018. Spain is the fifth country in the world in terms of installed wind power after China, the US, Germany and India.
Read Wind Energy in Spain

Fall2019 #GlobalVirtualCampus #NuclearEnergy #WindEnergy. ==> ” Pilgrim nuclear plant in Massachusetts shut down, a victim of rising costs and a technology that is struggling to remain economically viable in the United States. But the electricity generated by the aging nuclear station soon will be replaced by another carbon-free source: a fleet of 84 offshore wind turbines rising nearly 650 feet above the ocean’s surface. ” What are the trends in Clean Energies technologies? #DrLepervancheCampus

CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/GETTY IMAGES

“The developers of the Vineyard Wind project say their turbines—anchored about 14 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard—will generate 800 megawatts of electricity once they start spinning sometime in 2022. That’s equivalent to the output of a large coal-fired power plant and more than Pilgrim’s 640 megawatts. “

Read: Offshore Wind Farms Are Spinning Up in the US—At Last https://www.wired.com/story/offshore-wind-farms-are-spinning-up-in-the-us-at-last/?mbid=social_twitter_onsiteshare via @WIRED

Wind Energy in Spain
Wind Energy in the US

Sustainable Development Goals

#SDG7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

PROGRESS OF GOAL 7 IN 2019

Access to electricity in the poorest countries has begun to accelerate, energy efficiency continues to improve and renewable energy is making gains in electricity sector. Despite this progress, some 800 million people remain without electricity while access to clean cooking fuels and technologies needs dedicated attention. In addition, if Sustainable Development Goals 7, 13 and related Goals are to be met, much higher levels of ambition are required with regard to renewable energy, including transportation and heating.

  • The global electrification rate rose from 83 per cent in 2010 to 87 per cent in 2015, with the increase accelerating to reach 89 per cent in 2017. However, some 840 million people around the world are still without access to electricity.
  • The global share of the population with access to clean cooking fuels and technologies reached 61 per cent in 2017, up from 57 per cent in 2010. Despite this progress, close to 3 billion people still rely primarily on inefficient and polluting cooking systems.
  • The renewable energy share of total final energy consumption gradually increased from 16.6 per cent in 2010 to 17.5 per cent in 2016, though much faster change is required to meet climate goals. Even though the absolute level of renewable energy consumption has grown by more than 18 per cent since 2010, only since 2012 has the growth of renewables outpaced the growth of total energy consumption. E/2019/68 14/39 19-07404
  • Global primary energy intensity (ratio of energy used per unit of GDP) improved from 5.9 in 2010 to 5.1 in 2016, a rate of improvement of 2.3 per cent, which is still short of the 2.7 per cent annual rate needed to reach target 3 of Sustainable Development Goal 7.
  • International financial flows to developing countries in support of clean and renewable energy reached $18.6 billion in 2016, almost doubling from $9.9 billion in 2010.

Source: Report of the Secretary-General, Special edition: progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals

SDG7 Link

Global Energy Perspective 2019 / The Global Energy Perspective Reference Case and the Future of Energy Companies / #GlobalEnergy #SDG7

Global Energy Perspective 2019. The Global Energy Perspective Reference Case provides our view on how the energy transition will unfold. 

See report: “Energy systems around the world are going through rapid transitions that affect many aspects of our lives. The continuation and acceleration of these shifts will bring important changes to the way we fuel our cars, heat our homes, and power our industries in the coming decades. Our Reference Case provides our consensus view on how energy demand will evolve. “

Ref: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/oil-and-gas/our-insights/global-energy-perspective-2019

SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

” Modern society depends on reliable and affordable energy services to function smoothly and to develop equitably. A well-established energy system supports all sectors from medicine and education to agriculture, infrastructure, communications and high-technology. Intensive development patterns have historically relied on inexpensive and energy-dense fossil fuels, which also happen to be the primary source of greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change. However, new, clean technologies are available that can reorient development along a more sustainable trajectory. “

Ref: https://sdgcompass.org/sdgs/sdg-7/ #SDGCompass

Discussion:

What is the future of energy companies? What are the challenges that they are facing today? Add your ideas for solutions. How these solutions add contributions to #SDG7. Add links.

This week we are following EnergYear. An energy Congress in Madrid, Spain that focuses on renewable energies. Several international companies will share their views about the future.