Offshore Wind Farms in the US and Wind Energy in Spain / #SDG7

Wind turbines in La Palma, Canary Islands. Photo by @DrLepervanche. With 23,484 MW of accumulated capacity, wind energy has been the second source of electrical generation in Spain in 2018. Spain is the fifth country in the world in terms of installed wind power after China, the US, Germany and India.
Read Wind Energy in Spain

Fall2019 #GlobalVirtualCampus #NuclearEnergy #WindEnergy. ==> ” Pilgrim nuclear plant in Massachusetts shut down, a victim of rising costs and a technology that is struggling to remain economically viable in the United States. But the electricity generated by the aging nuclear station soon will be replaced by another carbon-free source: a fleet of 84 offshore wind turbines rising nearly 650 feet above the ocean’s surface. ” What are the trends in Clean Energies technologies? #DrLepervancheCampus

CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/GETTY IMAGES

“The developers of the Vineyard Wind project say their turbines—anchored about 14 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard—will generate 800 megawatts of electricity once they start spinning sometime in 2022. That’s equivalent to the output of a large coal-fired power plant and more than Pilgrim’s 640 megawatts. “

Read: Offshore Wind Farms Are Spinning Up in the US—At Last https://www.wired.com/story/offshore-wind-farms-are-spinning-up-in-the-us-at-last/?mbid=social_twitter_onsiteshare via @WIRED

Wind Energy in Spain
Wind Energy in the US

Sustainable Development Goals

#SDG7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

PROGRESS OF GOAL 7 IN 2019

Access to electricity in the poorest countries has begun to accelerate, energy efficiency continues to improve and renewable energy is making gains in electricity sector. Despite this progress, some 800 million people remain without electricity while access to clean cooking fuels and technologies needs dedicated attention. In addition, if Sustainable Development Goals 7, 13 and related Goals are to be met, much higher levels of ambition are required with regard to renewable energy, including transportation and heating.

  • The global electrification rate rose from 83 per cent in 2010 to 87 per cent in 2015, with the increase accelerating to reach 89 per cent in 2017. However, some 840 million people around the world are still without access to electricity.
  • The global share of the population with access to clean cooking fuels and technologies reached 61 per cent in 2017, up from 57 per cent in 2010. Despite this progress, close to 3 billion people still rely primarily on inefficient and polluting cooking systems.
  • The renewable energy share of total final energy consumption gradually increased from 16.6 per cent in 2010 to 17.5 per cent in 2016, though much faster change is required to meet climate goals. Even though the absolute level of renewable energy consumption has grown by more than 18 per cent since 2010, only since 2012 has the growth of renewables outpaced the growth of total energy consumption. E/2019/68 14/39 19-07404
  • Global primary energy intensity (ratio of energy used per unit of GDP) improved from 5.9 in 2010 to 5.1 in 2016, a rate of improvement of 2.3 per cent, which is still short of the 2.7 per cent annual rate needed to reach target 3 of Sustainable Development Goal 7.
  • International financial flows to developing countries in support of clean and renewable energy reached $18.6 billion in 2016, almost doubling from $9.9 billion in 2010.

Source: Report of the Secretary-General, Special edition: progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals

SDG7 Link

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